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Drinking Tea And Memory

 
Author: Edward J Okello, M.D.

October 24, 2004. Tests by a team from the University of Newcastle upon Tyne found that green and black tea inhibit the activity of certain enzymes in the brain that are associated with memory. Researchers hope the findings will lead to the development of a new treatment for Alzheimer's Disease.

Lead researcher, Dr Ed Okello, who is a lecturer with Newcastle University's School of Biology, said: "Although there is no cure for Alzheimer's, tea could potentially be another weapon in the armory which is used to treat this disease and slow down its development. It would be wonderful if our work could help improve the quality of life for millions of sufferers and their caregivers."

"Our findings are particularly exciting as tea is already a very popular drink, it is inexpensive, and there do not seem to be any adverse side effects when it is consumed. Still, we expect it will be several years until we are able to produce anything marketable."

Dr Okello, himself a green tea drinker, said the findings of the research suggested tea could boost the memory of everyday drinkers: "The ageing politician, Tony Benn, is a prime example of somebody who drinks tea and has a fantastic memory. He is said to drink 18 pints a day and has a very sharp mind for a man of his age," he added. The findings, which are published in the academic journal, Phytotherapy Research, may lead to the development of a new treatment for a form of dementia which affects an estimated ten million people worldwide, Alzheimer's Disease.

They found that both green and black tea inhibited the activity of enzymes associated with the development of Alzheimer's Disease, but coffee had no significant effect.

Both teas inhibited the activity of the enzyme acetylcholinesterase (AChE), which breaks down the chemical messenger or neurotransmitter, acetylcholine. Alzheimer's is characterised by a drop in acetylcholine.

Green tea and black tea also hinder the activity of the enzyme butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE), which has been discovered in protein deposits which are found on the brain of patients with Alzheimer's.

Green tea went one step even further in that it obstructed the activity of beta-secretase, which plays a role in the production of protein deposits in the brain which are associated with Alzheimer's disease. Green tea also continued to have its inhibitive effect for a week, whereas black tea's effect on the enzymes lasted for only one day.

The Newcastle University researchers are now seeking funding to carry out further tests on green tea, which they hope will include clinical trials. Their aim is to work towards the development of a medicinal tea which is specifically aimed at Alzheimer's sufferers.

The next step is to find out exactly which components of green tea inhibit the activity of the enzymes AChE, BuChE and beta-secretase.

Prof Clive Ballard, director of research, Alzheimer's Society, said: "This interesting research builds on previous evidence that suggests that green tea may be beneficial due to anti-oxidant properties. Certainly the effect on the cholinesterase enzyme (the target of current anti-dementia drugs such as Aricept) and beta-secretase (an enzyme which is important in the build up of plaques) is very exciting and requires further investigation."

STORY SOURCE AND JOURNAL REF: 'In vitro Anti-beta-secretase and dual anti-cholinesterase activities of Camellia sinensis L. (tea) relevant to treatment of dementia'; Edward J Okello et al, Phytotherapy Research, 18 624-627 (2004) Dr. Ed Okello at Newcastle University's Medicinal Plant Research Center, where he led a study comparing effects of coffee, green tea and black tea on memory.

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